Five popular kitchen styles to consider for your remodel

When choosing what to wear, you first need to know what kind of attire—casual, business, dressy—is appropriate. In the same vein, when choosing elements for your kitchen makeover, you first need to know the look you’re going for. To help you figure out what best “suits” you, the following are this year’s five most popular kitchen styles. Which one resonates with you the most?
 

Transitional
The experts agree: Atlanta homeowners love a transitional kitchen. This makes sense, since this style combines elements of traditional and contemporary design, offering the best of both worlds. “It is a blend of today’s styles with traditions of yesterday,” says Chelsey Wynn with Wellborn Cabinet. She explains that these kitchens “dress up” simple designs with different wood species, finishes, embellishments, moldings and hoods. She also adds that a mix of door styles is also common, such as both full overlay and inset doors.

“A perfect example of what we are seeing in transitional kitchens are stained cabinets on the perimeter with a pop of color on the island,” Wynn says, “or painted kitchen cabinets on the perimeter with a stained island.”
 

Classic 
This is for the no-frills crowd. Wood cabinets, stone countertops and a functional, straightforward design are what most appeals to you. You know what you like, and you like what you know.

If this describes you, a classic kitchen is your style. In this type of kitchen, white or natural-toned wood cabinetry abounds, and there’s little deviation from one basic color scheme. Added function in the form of glide-out shelving and other organizational upgrades are mostly seen behind the cabinet doors. “I still see a lot of demand for the white kitchen and bathroom,” says Robin Lamonte of Rooms Revamped.
 

Elegant
This kitchen style is for those who enjoy architectural details, such as cabinetry with molding, furniture-style legs and ornate woodwork. Against a base of rich-toned cabinetry (such as cherry or ebony) sits granite or marble countertops, with wood-paneled hoods over the centerpiece stovetop-area, tiled backsplash. Lighting—specifically chandeliers over the island—plays a big part in completing the design of these kitchens.
 

Rustic
Au naturale is the theme for rustic kitchens. Cabinetry that shows wood grain and natural tones is key, along with basic, straightforward design. Other natural elements, such as walls or backsplashes that look like stacked stone, exposed wooden beams along the ceiling or reclaimed-wood floors and shelving are also popular among homeowners who enjoy this style.
 

Modern
Perhaps the most controversial kitchen style among Southerners is the modern aesthetic because it goes against the traditional style that Georgians feel is their signature. Comprised of sleek elements, straight lines and often a black-and-white palette with one bright pop of color as a focal point, the modern style is most often seen in urban residences.

To get the modern look, your focus should be on solid colors. Avoid the appearance of wood grain in cabinetry—if you still want wood cabinets, have them painted, not stained. Consider quartz or concrete countertops instead of granite to ensure a solid color. 

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